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  1. #21
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    Hi Keith, I will be fitting the pieces you mention tomorrow so the next pictures will show what you need to know. The red one goes behind the other small piece and the top part will be welded to the inner post, the area with holes in it and tabs to grip the stuff the tin tacks are hammered into for the trimming. The pictures will help. This is just my interpretation of what needs to be done and I have done the same thing 3 different ways with only small detail differences. Yes the upstand should butt to the inner wing arch but I wont know how close I've got it until I drill through. If its close I will pop rivet x 2 but if a gap will opt for self tappers.
    Last edited by Perfect65; 10-11-2015 at 17:55.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

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  3. #22
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    I assembled the C post repair pieces and welded them in today. Here are some pictures to prove it. The first 2 are the assembled items before welding.




    Then next is the inner C post repair piece after welding. I lifted the tabs and prised out the tack strip as this burns easily and although it may need replacing anyway I cant stand the smoke in my throat and eyes and lungs.


    This is the inner wing repair that is also combined with the repair to the arch up to the second hank bush. The edge of the flange piece is turned in slightly to help maintain the radiused edge during and after welding.


    This is the arch repair further up. All just tacked so far.

    Todays welding..........


    And the next area round the arch to be repaired and ready for some rust treatment up inside
    with the position of the hank bush marked.

    This is the repair target at the rearmost position. I cut around the area to be removed but not quite into the corners. I then took some thin card, a bit like the card that Shredded Wheat had in the box between the layers and which my mum used to line our shoes when they had a hole, that was in the fifties...do you remember that? Anyway, I took a rubbing which marked out the line for the insert metal as well as the hole for the bush.




    I left the lower edge piece in place as that can help keep the shape and alignment and also it was not so rotten as the rest......
    and now a new piece welded in but not without difficulty. I should have cut out more metal further up as I had to chase a few holes that appeared as I was finishing. All done now - perfection takes a little longer.




    And then a bit more inserted on the front of the arch. I tried out a different rust treatment on the inside of this section before welding the patch in - a Phosphoric acid clear solution. Its strong stuff as it dissolved the Bondaprimer I had put on the lower section a few days ago so needs to be used with care. In a similar situation I would still use the water based type like Aquasteel.

    Next I will lightly grind off the welds and bolt on the rear wing to make sure it all lines up ok then move up to the A post. I already worked on the flanges on the wing when I was working on the previous Prefect - economies of scale? I need a few days off as welding in all those awkward positions has left me with a bit of back ache. If all goes to plan I will complete all the mechanical repairs and mods including a rebuilt engine by about March so I can get prepping and painting.
    I have just fitted the rear wing to check on the fit and alignment. It took a few tries to get it lined up but just need to elongate some of the new hole or where I have fitted new hank bushes so I can get the back end finishing in line with the back of the body.
    . You can see where the wing was repaired too. This was done about 3 years ago and the surprising thing about this car was that although rusty it wasn't knocked about too bad. This wing had just one small ding that took me about 1 minute to erase today.




    Thats three out of four so now for the last A post. Luckily this area is not as bad as I first thought but this time I will cut out more rusty metal so I dont go chasing rust holes again.
    Incidentally, another job I did some years back, while working on the previous car I serviced 3 of them, was the steering box. This was dismantled, cleaned, painted, new ball bearings and a new oil seal fitted. The original 'seal' was just a square secton rubber ring that always dripped oil. It now has a garter spring seal and no drips from there but the other places that leak like the end cover - still leak. I had to make a fixture to support the drop arm while I pressed out the steering shaft. It let go with a bang.
    Last edited by Perfect65; 16-12-2015 at 18:39.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

  4. #23
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    I started cutting the A post and inner wing areas with rot in them a few weeks back so some of the pictures have already been posted but will repeat some here to keep it easier to 'read'. About half the bottom closing panel is bad but it will be better to replace all of it with nice strong new metal. The actual door post is now separated from the chassis and I have cut it back to sound steel. Next job is to make up a new section, actually two pieces welded together. Instead of rivets I will use M5 button head screws with nyloc nut. The inner plate will be bigger than the original and bolted to the chassis in 3 places. At least one of these bolts is sited inside the cross member so need a little trick to feed it through. Pictures to follow.

    This is the bottom closing panel.


    And then with a chunk cut out to explore the rotten areas.



    This is the inner A post section, the main part that supports the door post at this point.



    Its in two pieces welded together, one part up against the chassis and the other connects to the door post.



    As I was preparing this area I got a better view inside the inner wing and saw much worse corrosion than first thought so now had to remove a larger area. Could be worse I guess. The bluish tint is the rust converter that hasn't cured yet.

    Until the door post is fully supported I have this prop to stop it sinking.

    Last edited by Perfect65; 27-11-2015 at 13:49.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

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  6. #24
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    While in the workshop today I thought I would start repairing a spare boot door I bought a few years ago just to get the stainless flash that fits behind the T handle lock. I was going to scrap it but after having a good look round it I felt it worth having a go. It looked like it had been dropped on one top corner so this took a lot of careful hammer work before I felt it was good enough to save the door. First I welded in a patch along the bottom of the inner panel so it was held together down there, not pretty but it is mostly out of sight and a bit of filler and paint should make it look better. Next I cut out the mothy bottom of the skin and as we well know likely to be much worse than it looks at first glance. I was not disappointed as it was nearly through along most of its length. Cutting with a thin wheel was straightforward but rooting out the spot welds round the edge took a lot longer as I needed to retain the integrity of the inner panel as much as possible.


    Once this section was off it revealed a bit more rot on the corner.

    This was cut back and a new piece made and welded in.


    The replacement skin will be flanged on 3 sides, the bottom is curved, and the join to the old skin will be joddled and fixed with countersunk pop rivets. I made a tool to fit my Whitney punch that presses a countersink in sheet metal and hopefully this will make a reasonably smooth strong joint to be finished with a skim of filler. Both components have to be countersunk so they snuggle up close. As the angle on the rivets for sheet metal is around 120° the countersink can be finally dressed with a standard drill bit as its close to the same angle.





    I ran out of time at this point but not before I made up a new closing panel for the A post in 18g ready to be trimmed after the old one has been cut out.

    And now with drain hole formed by a 3/4" steel ball.





    Back to the boot door for an hour or two. A new lower skin cut to over size, lower return formed over a piece of pine bed frame planed to the near-enough curve of the bottom edge. This return was expected to crinkle when the piece was pulled over the curvature of the door skin so a few relieving cuts were made in the flange. The cuts overlapped when the new skin was tried again so will need further treatment with a thin cutting wheel or snips.




    Yes, that is blood on the skin - mine, and I was being careful.






    Before I finally close up the repair I will treat the rust and get plenty of paint inside, something sadly lacking in the original manufacture. Its strange how the external paint was of high quality but totally absent in many internal structural areas hidden from the customers eyes. I dont suppose Henry and Co expected this motor to last so long. The final repair will be mainly a cold one but there will be some edge welds on the outer flanges to secure the skin where it was previously spot welded.









    Last edited by Perfect65; 12-12-2015 at 19:40.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

  7. #25
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    At last I have got some new metal welded into the A post. This is the inner part that attaches the A post to the chassis.

    This is the lower part of the inner wing.

    The next part is the rest of the inner wing to take it round the wing fairing and on to the door post where it wraps over the inner part in the first picture above.



    My regular readers may recall my reference to a trick to get the 1/4" bolts through the inner A post plate where access is from inside a chassis cross member and impossible to feed them through by hand. All I did here was drill the holes and feed a length of welding wire through to where there is an access hole in the centre of the cross member. I had already drilled the threaded ends of the bolts to be a clearance fit over the wire so I then Loctited the bolts onto the wires and got on with something else. Later I pulled the bolts through and slipped a washer, spring washer and nut over the wire and bolt. After tightening the nut I just clipped the wire off.


    Last edited by Perfect65; 01-12-2015 at 18:13.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

  8. #26
    I'm a grown up member now ! pop351red's Avatar
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    nice to see a bit of gas welding for a change from mig i like to do gas myself . keep up the good work mate you will help me put my prefect together when i get round to it

  9. #27
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pop351red View Post
    nice to see a bit of gas welding for a change from mig i like to do gas myself . keep up the good work mate you will help me put my prefect together when i get round to it
    Hope the pics will help you. I have now finally 'signed off' the A post and pleased to get the worst of the welding done. Its been a bit patch-work and in hindsight I should have cut back further but I am not going back over it now as I have an engine to build. Here are some pictures of the final welding.

    Heres the bottom plate or closer in place to be marked out for trimming. I left it about 3mm oversize so I didn't need to use any filler rod when I welded it shut - tight as usual.


    And heres a view underneath after welding.


    And this is how most will see it, well it will have some filler and paint over it of course.

    And here with the filler done.


    Next, the trusty sidevalve engine with just minor tuning. I have a choice from about 3 or 4 engines all needing work so will sort out the best collection of parts for the first effort. Having had a good look over the parts I picked out one that had a lump broken out of the bell housing but the broken piece was still present. I bolted the engine to a spare gearbox shell and took it down to Martin at Fine Limit Welding in Basildon. He made a good job of attaching the broken piece so after that expense it had better work out ok. This engine came as a spare with the car and I had thought it a write off but it turned out to be usable as it was sleeved back to standard and the bores cleaned up not too bad. One piston was almost new although the others were scrap. I am hoping some spare standard used pistons I have will be usable as the crank and valve seats are reclaimable. Its surprising what you can get away with on these old sidevalves which is good as it is likely the mileage will be low from now on. If the valves are a little slack in the guides or the pistons rattle it will be like old times. As long as the rings and the conrod bearings are reasonable I will live with it.The oil pump has been renovated and the compression higher than the original 6.1:1 by using a Ford 7Y 8HP head giving 7.6:1, a common tuning mod in the days of Ford fibreglass bodied specials. As already mentioned the inlet manifold no longer has a 'hot spot' to keep the carb' cooler and anyway my view is that modern fuel doesn't need it as it vapourises at lower temperatures than the 1930s fuel the engine was designed for. As for ignition timing, when that day comes I will set it roughly with the peg and then with the distributor body clamp slackened just enough to turn by hand, I will increase revs to around 1500/2000 and advance slowly until it starts to 'jib' then retard a smigeon so it runs smooth.
    Last edited by Perfect65; 22-01-2016 at 19:07.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

  10. #28
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    I have just seen a neat little electronic ignition unit that fits inside the standard distributor and does away with the points. About £50 on ebay. In one of my other cars I have an electronic sort of gadget from Boyer Bransden that keeps the points but using them purely as a very low current switch -- about £35 when I bought it about 6 years ago.
    Anyway, back to the engine. I have 3 engine blocks on the go so should get one going and the others will follow later if/when I need an engine change. First engine is +40 and good bores. This will have new pistons and I have sorted the valves and clearances. One valve has a deep cut seat in the block as a result of some previous mishap but I think it should perform ok. Second engine is +60 and the general state is good. I can use the pistons and have some wider rings to go in the top groove after I re-cut them. I usually use the machined diameter inside the skirt to locate the piston on a turned spigot in the lathe. I have a hook that fits round the gudgeon pin and a long pull rod down the lathe shaft so it all holds in tight while the grooves are cut. I have found that 100e rings are one possible as the second ring is wider so swapping the compression rings round gives me a wide one for the top. The second ring grooves are all ok. This engine had some corrosion holes in the valve chamber from the water jacket so these were repaired with stainless plates, both inside and out, fixed with screws, and JB weld to fill any gaps. It will need Barsleaks added to the water to ensure the water stays put in case theres a pin hole somewhere. Click on this link for more detail - https://www.rodsnsods.co.uk/forum/tec...-jacket-397922
    The third engine was mentioned above and is a good prospect as soon as I get the new top rings for it and machine the grooves.
    Last edited by Perfect65; 03-12-2016 at 09:00.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

  11. #29
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    Number one engine now assembled and waiting warmer weather so I can give it a coat of Ford green paint, add some engine oil and spin it up on the starter to check the oil pressure. I decided not to run the engine on the assembly stand as I have too much work on at the moment. If all ok it will be installed in the car as its easier to attach the various ancillaries and connections with the side panels off.
    I span the engine today using a 12 volt battery and the oil pressure was 20psi - too low. I changed the pressure relief valve spring and it went up to 28psi so that will do for now (workshop manual says the standard pressure is 30psi. Small Ford do replacement springs so will try one of those in due course. Cylinder compression was 125 plus so again all good to go. I am using Comma straight 40 engine oil as it will be warmer when I eventually run the engine. Its a non-detergent oil as mileage will be low and I wont be using the bipass filter.
    I have a 6 volt petrol pump that will fit in the chassis rail by the rear passenger door. Petrol tank went in last week. I hope to start on the used standard pistons tomorrow by machining the top ring grooves and then the circlip grooves to suit Seger clips as the original wire circlip grooves are in poor shape, probably caused by the sloppy fitting gudgeon pins hammering the clips. I have found some better pins now. Make-do-and-mend at its best.
    Update: I found the standard pistons had smaller than standard gudgeon pins originally so I could ream the piston holes to 11/16" and the replacement pins pushed in nicely. I then cut the new circlip grooves. These pistons didn't have oil holes under the pin bosses as is usual with this engine so this was done also.
    Engine now in so I can have a relaxing time fitting all the ancillary items. Pity the picture colour is wrong as engine is a nice dark Ford green - I think its the flash that ruins it. I hope to get it running well before I start on the body prep and paint.

    Last edited by Perfect65; 03-02-2016 at 18:36.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

  12. #30
    Official RnS Addict Perfect65's Avatar
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    I am thinking about the roof fill again now the engine is in and I can relax a bit on that front. As mentioned before the car is generally solid up top but the metal was rusty in some areas and the channel where the original roof rubber seal was fitted has gone through in places. My plan to solder the roof is not looking too sound as rusty steel needs a lot of grinding back to make it solderable. Currently I am wondering if Sikaflex or Tigerseal as suggested by someone previously might be better but with reinforcement with countersunk pop rivets and a full covering of a good quality hard filler, maybe metalised type. If I insert the rivets in the inner section of the roof channel it is easily reversed if it goes pear shaped and wont change the roof skin itself. Just thinking out loud.
    Last edited by Perfect65; 03-02-2016 at 18:39.
    Greatest discombobulations to all my readers.

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