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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Its almost 2 years to the day that Boyd Coddington sadly passed away causing the "Boyd Coddington Hotrods" company to close down. This is where the TV series "American Hotrod" which is showing every week night on freeview channel 38 Quest was filmed, I have also found out that Boyds right hand man/ar5e kicker Duane Mayer has set up his own custom car building company with 2 of the original TV series staff, heres a link to his website below. www.americanhotrodsinc.com
 

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Possibly the greatest rod designer of our time who will be sadly missed:smoke:Jeff
 

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the aluma truck and tub were eddie wimble designs
and a lot of the early stuff was thom tayler and chip ,,
all working for the man ,,, rip boyed
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I must admit that when you watch the series you realise just how many idiots were working for the company also I did'nt realise that the grumpy lady book keeper was his 1st wife :grr: .........much prefer the 2nd one.
 

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Let's hope their cars are better than that bloody annoying website.

In my opinion Duane was, and probably still is, a fat :wanker:
 

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Fantasic insperation to the Hotrod world, he kept it alive as long as he could, some would say that the man was a knob, in opinion, he was the daddy of rodding perfection :tup:

RIP :sniff:
 

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the aluma truck and tub were eddie wimble designs
and a lot of the early stuff was thom tayler and chip ,,
all working for the man ,,, rip boyed
Sorry, Ed only designed the truck. The tub was a blatent rip off, when you look at it closely. ;)
 

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thought the boydsters where designed by Foose too....
pascal
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
anyone know how much a Boyd finished project would have cost to get built? sure to be £100,000ish or am I way off ? also I notice that they buy most of the parts off the shelf i.e front clip, rear axels, chassis, engines etc, seems like they only did the body work as the cars interior work was shipped out as well. not knocking his finished projects but it must make life a hell of a lot easier when you can buy all the parts brand new and off the shelf, beats groveling around in a scrap yard. :sleep:
 

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Have to say how amused i was about the amount of doggy that was applied to nearly all the cars, ive not seen a full car skimmed before!:wtf:
 

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american hotrod

It's a shame nobody carried the business on........suppose I'll just have to get my inspiration from chop shop now!:wanker::tdown::shake::sniff::lol::incheek:love to know if they've ever seen that crap in the states :grr:...highly embarrasing:oops::pmsl::pmsl:
 

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It's a shame nobody carried the business on........suppose I'll just have to get my inspiration from chop shop now!:wanker::tdown::shake::sniff::lol::incheek:love to know if they've ever seen that crap in the states :grr:...highly embarrasing:oops::pmsl::pmsl:
They did, check out these links..................................

http://www.autoblog.com/2008/07/30/the-legend-lives-on-coddington-boys-establish-sons-of-boyd-llc/

http://www.sonsofboyd.com/

In the "our father" section, at last the designers get some recognition
 

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the aluma truck and tub were eddie wimble designs
and a lot of the early stuff was thom tayler and chip ,,
all working for the man ,,, rip boyed
Well, Ed......

I designed the Aluma Truck, which was based on my earlier idea of constructing a fairly stock bodied rod built entirely from aluminum wherever possible, Body, Frame, Suspension, Axles, Wheels, Engine, Trans' & interior. There's actually a bigger story behind this idea.

The Aluma Tub was based on the same concept as the truck but using a two door '29 phaeton body style, I didn't actually design the tub, as far as I'm aware it was more a case of design by commitee for the TV series.

I initially rendered the Aluma Truck body with the stock '29 rear quarters and back panels, a couple inches out the roof, and a bobbed Model A bed. However, there were problems in keeping the body back panels flat so we opted for the curved form of the 1930 body back panel and the service car smooth side bed instead. I actually prefer it as it is now. I did the original Magneeto wheels specifically for this truck then they were put into production.

Going backwards, I designed for Boyd:

The "banana" uprights for the later Boyd front ends using the streamline A arms, and further wheel designs, 2000/2001

Various ideas based on my hidden suspension, wedge, modified track roadster concept, and other vehicles - roadsters and coupes mainly, along the same theme. Boyd wanted to build the wedge modified for years, but never did.

Also, some ideas for T, A, & B highboy sedans & sedan delivery's and, 400-A, B-400 & C-400 convertible sedans, all based on the aluminium monocoque chassis tub concept. but I kept all these and the wedge ideas to myself in the end.

The Aluma Truck, around 1999/2000

An updated version of the Speed Racer comic book vehicle for an intended Future TV programme which never happened, approx 1999

The Led Zephyr, loosely based on a '39 Lincoln fastback sedan (whoever came up with that moniker needs throttling), 1998

A number of design studies for Honda 4WD & people carriers. 1998

I did almost the entire wheel range for Boyd when he started up again in 1998. That's the elliptical big window style which every other wheel maker now has versions of....I wanted to bring back real "hot rod" wheels with big windows and fluid form to the centres - tough looking wheels with lots of eye appeal, like big window Halibrand Sprints & Speedways, or ET IIIs. Until then billet wheels had evolved into, more or less, flat centres with small odd shape windows and the design element concentrated into ball milled stepped designs in the spokes - the spokes had become the design focus of the wheel rather than the windows. I hated that as they were all immediately forgetable.

The second Cutaway painting of the Musselman '34 roadster AMBR winner, 1995

A painting of the Mitsubishi Coupe, 1994

The three-spoke wheels for the Boydster 1 '32 roadster AMBR winner, (subsequently modified by Lil' John Buttera with reversed & ball milled spokes), 1990s sometime?

The first cutaway painting of the Musselman '34 roadster AMBR winner, 1983

The Boydsters:
The actual "concept" for these originally came from me back in 1982/83, not from Chip.
The original vehicle concept I had in mind, which was developed from a combination of ideas I had for a '29 roadster, and a '29 modified in 1978, was for an all aluminium monocoque roadster with a '33/4 style grille, using hidden suspension at the front, Porsche 928 A transaxle at the rear, streamline /airfoil shape control arms, full bellypan, and (to clean up the outside body lines), combining the grille, hood and cowl panels into one piece items in order to lose all those ugly vertical cut lines at the front of the car.

This was, in fact, a completely new concept at the time and was initially the design for a new car intended for Jamie Musselman (the 1980 AMBR winner).

Boyd didn't use any of the ideas from this concept for a number of years (Musselman found a B-400 convertible sedan instead, which he just had to have), until they built the Larry Erikson designed Mitsubishi Coupe, then the "Roadstar" '37 style roadster, based on my original ideas. Unfortunately for the Roadstar, they never grasped how the front suspension idea worked and used an airfoil shape swing arm layout instead (very bad idea). The idea of getting rid of the grille/hood/cowl vertical cut lines at the front of the body, however, spawned a whole new style which later evolved into the Boydsters, then into those awful jelly mould (or is it, jelly bean ?), cars- a bridge too far in my opinion, and completely missing the point of my original concept.

I've actually been designing for Boyd on & off from the early days, since around 1980 or 81 - almost as long as Thom Taylor as it goes, and for more years than Chip Foose. Boyd often asked me for input on other people's designs, i.e. try to improve them, and I know he gave my ideas to others for their input, but I wouldn't go along with that.

As for the TV show: Keep in mind it was just that - a TV show, with a preconceived narrative for each episode which relied heavily on ongoing arguments, dramas, time schedules and cockups to keep it controversial. No doubt this was all based on enhanced versions of real events but, lets face it, no hot rod shop could survive too long if this were real. I dare say the TV show became the priority over the hot rod shop at the end, as it probably had to.

I last saw Boyd in October 2007 and he was looking pretty poorly then, didn't expect it to be the last time though - he was a pretty tough old bird.

Apart from Boyd, Boyd Jr, Jo, Greg and Dianne, I knew Duane, Mike, Roy & Charlie plus the guys in the wheel shop, and actually they were or still are all ok guys with their own odd nuances and character - just like the rest of us. As far as Boyd & Duane being "knobs", as mentioned in earlier posts here, well......I guess every one of us is a knob in our own way - right? But we're not all on TV to be scrutinized, are we?

Undoubtedly, fame got to some more than others and egos must have been distorted & distended because of it. I could always have a great laugh with Duane anytime as he was always up to mischief. Mike is sharp as a tack with autocad and CNC machining, same with Roy and the metalshaping.
 

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Have to say how amused i was about the amount of doggy that was applied to nearly all the cars, ive not seen a full car skimmed before!:wtf:
It's all a matter of practicality, depth of pockets, and what the owner wants.

Skimming the entire car and reshaping prior to paint is a regular and economical way of prepping the body, even new bodies, 'cause they all need some work prior to paint. Either that, or many many hours/$$$ doing very expensive, perfect, metal finishing - which will end up being filled to a certain degree anyhow.

By the time it's sanded back there's usually very little filler left, which is then covered with high build primer, basically the same plastic based material as the filler. It's just one method of getting a job done for a specific price.

I've seen guys take out all the lead, metal finish the steel to the point of absolute perfection, tig weld the joints and spot welds in and under the car, dress 'em, file the whole surface, sand, scotchbrite, all the time oiling the surface - cos it's gonna take years and rust is a no no, to finally finish up with a perfectly straight but paper thin body - which then gets covered in plastic primer and paint, or else is left bare metal as a showcase to a person's anal retentive ability - but it'll never be driven because now it's a showcar.

A perfect metal finish job like this could easily cost upwards of $100 000 and probably much, much, more nowadays. For a street driven car, it ain't worth it.
 
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