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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title says really .

I always have trouble with the workpiece warping all out of shape and setting things up to stay in position , e.g. after cutting mitres on brass angle what's the best way to hold it in position while you solder it etc .

Cheers,
Ron
 

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That's an interesting question. I have never tried silver soldering, just ordinary soldering, but I would imagine the principles are the same. Correct tools, scrupulously clean materials, and the right amount of heat.

As for holding things, why not clamp it to an offcut of mdf?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Same principles Sid but a lot more heat , whatever you use to work on has to be fireproof . I use some flat firebricks about 8" X 6" X 2" like they build into the back of fireplaces , 4 of 'em laid flat and two stood on edge at the back .

Trouble I have is , say two pieces of 1" X 1" X 1/8" brass angle mitred to form the corner of a frame and I set them into position with some weights , have to get it so hot to get the solder to flow that the end 2 or 3" of the brass always warps and twists so you lose your 90 degree corner and have to try and straighten it out again .

I used to use a guy who works at my local chrome platers but they've got so expensive now I'm trying to teach myself .
 

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I had to teach myself to silver solder a few years ago. I bought this book and found it very helpful.

Soldering and Brazing by Tubal Cain

There are various grades of solder so maybe you are using a particularly "hot" or "hard" type? I've found this company very useful for supplies and great for tech help on the phone too.

cupalloys

A jig of some sort for work holding may help if you're doing the same job repetetively? Or clamping to some steel away from the joint?

This case is made of lots of mitred/soldered joints. I only weighted the part down when soldering but was able to tweak the various frames back into square if need be.



What are you making? :)
 

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I had to teach myself to silver solder a few years ago. I bought this book and found it very helpful.

Soldering and Brazing by Tubal Cain

There are various grades of solder so maybe you are using a particularly "hot" or "hard" type? I've found this company very useful for supplies and great for tech help on the phone too.

cupalloys

A jig of some sort for work holding may help if you're doing the same job repetetively? Or clamping to some steel away from the joint?

This case is made of lots of mitred/soldered joints. I only weighted the part down when soldering but was able to tweak the various frames back into square if need be.



What are you making? :)
Probably 50 pence bits knowing Ron! ;) :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for those links Seth , the book looks very useful , now ordered .

Lovely clock case , who does your gilding ?

Here's some examples of the sort of stuff I make , for an idea of size the square light was 2ft X 2ft . If I could find a friendly caster who was willing to do reasonably priced one offs I'd go that route but whenever I've tried to get a quote it's always prohibitively expensive .





 

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Cool stuff Stitch. Certain elements of the clock case were castings but done by a jewellery casters in London so too small for the kind of thing you're doing (The case is approx 6" high). The gilding was done by a chap in North Kent. I could dig out the details of you need them. :)
 

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We used to use silver solder in the radiator trade where you needed a stronger joint than solder. It was possible to solder while in position without running the normal solder from tube ends .However the heat required to braze wouldlbe enough to melt normal solder normal solder in the vicinity ( as many who tried piep repairs at home discovered ) .

By the way Seth, love the signature .
 

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By the way Seth, love the signature .
Thanks Kev, came across it when remindeing myself how good that era of R&C was a couple of weeks ago.:)

Stitch, as another thought (that you may come across in the book anyway), you might find you could "tack-solder" using a high temp solder and then do the joint with a softer solder being careful not to get it too hot and melt the tacks.
 

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I'd go with whats already been said about using a 'soft' garde of silver solder, but a tip I would give you is to hammer your solder rod flat and as thin as you can get it and keep it it one piece then it melts almost instantly so you can get the heat off it quicker and not as much excess solder on your piece.
 
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