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Discussion Starter #1,102
I know adding spacers is ok (Ford did it as std on the M16 calipers on my car) but how do you seal the plate to the caliper body to prevent leaks?
I've counterbored the inner caliper halves to accept a small 'O' ring, same as the outers.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,103 (Edited)
Going with the flow.

As I'm thrashing through the last part of the build and trying to get everything ready for assembly (after paint, obvs) my gaze fell upon the fuel system.
The conundrum is getting two -8AN lines from the two fuel pumps, through two one-way valves (to prevent back-flow) and a big fuel filter to end up at the reg on the firewall.
Pumps are mounted, reg is mounted, but the space I want to put the fuel filter is too short to allow this:



A total of 6 separate fittings to achieve what I need, and a whopping 180mm of length. Pretty ugly too IMHO.

It would be nice to mount the two one-way valves directly to the filter cap, thereby saving about 130mm:



My solution was to cut the AN flare from the end of the filter cap and machine that flat, then turn the AN thread from the end-cap of the one-way valve into a tube, press those (interference fit) into holes drilled in the end-cap and weld it all up:



This will be re-anodised in my chosen shade of silver before assembly, but you get the idea.
Internally the inlets nicely miss the filter retaining spring so the flow shouldn't be impeded at all.

 

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Discussion Starter #1,108
Going with the flow. Pt2. Plus a bit more hothead.

As may have been noticed I'm a bit anal when it comes to plumbing. I built the chassis with channels running down it so that all of the fuel and brake plumbing can stay virtually straight without having to miss crossmembers etc. Well that's all good, but when the fuel line gets to the front of the car inside the chassis and you need it to be outside of the chassis, what's the neatest way?

Hopefully this:



It's a 40mm long (the width of the main chassis member) x 38mm dia steel tube with a steel centre (turned down from 6mm) welded about 1/3rd into it. The washer was turned with a lip around the inner edge so I didn't have to add filler rod when it was welded.
This is done to take an AN8 90 degree bulkhead (inside) and a 90 degree hose end (outside) to keep everything tight and tidy:



And when the requisite 40mm hole is drilled through the chassis and the tube passed through:





Next up an addition to the rear head cooling mod, this little doohickey:



Made from an old AN8 hose end, an old AN10 male adapter and a new (bloody $11.50!) capillary temp gauge adapter all fused together with the ubiquitous electric glue.
It goes here:





and will be virtually hidden by the inlet manifold etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,110
It might be worth adding a support bracket to that, vibration might stress the plate on the head as its only the one bolt.
The one bolt on the flange is a bit of a red herring. The plug with 'O' ring secures the whole thing very well so the bolt is just a 'belt & braces' device. It's very solid.
If I think there's an issue I'll add a bracket, and obviously the capillary tube will be nicely clipped up.
 

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i think mark wasn't so much referring to it coming out but the whole lot flexing with the possibility of it cracking. there's quite a lot there now all hanging from that one point and with flexy pipes going away from it they won't give much support. we could be worrying about nothing and you're the one who can judge if it's all stiff/supported enough as you can get hold of it to check for any flex.
neil.
 

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^^^ exactly that. Ive had 6mm plate steel crack from minor vibration from stress, so that would be a prime candidate for stress cracks on the T sections. Might not need it but it will always crack at the worst time if you don't.
and once the inlet etc is on it'd be a real shit to get to.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,114
PC. Plumbing & Chassis...

Continuing with 'Hot Rod Housekeeping' and the myriad of small things to do before painting the chassis.
Carrying on with the fuel filter, this obviously needs a bracket and the fixings for said bracket need to be in place before paint is applied.
The filter mounts under the floor and inside of the main chassis member so there was no need to go crazy with the design. Just something simple:



This mounts (via one location bolt ant two 'clamping' bolts to the chassis here:



You can see why I needed to save space on fittings. In this shot you can also see (left and right) the channels in the chassis for plumbing and wiring to pass through.

Enough of that, let's break out the welder for one last fling!
First up, finish welded the channels that run through (and attach to) the motor plate as I couldn't complete them with the engine/motor plate in place, and seam-welded the fuel bulkhead tube in the right-hand chassis:



One of the problems I encountered on strip-down was removal of the propshaft. This has been in place for (literally) years and a lot of the surrounding metalwork was formed around it.
At the very top of this picture is a very short crossmember that ties the 'K' member together. It's probably totally unnecessary as the gearbox crossmember is only about 100mm in front of it, but with it in place the propshaft is virtually impossible to remove without a huge amount of swearing and scratching of paint. No problem at the moment, but as soon as it's shiny :shake:



Out with Grindy McGrinder and the crossmember was gone! But soon Cutty McCutter, Drilly McDriller, Tappy McTapper and Weldy McWelder were dragged into play to make this:





150mm of shaped, drilled and tapped drop-out crossmember, held in place by no less than 4 M12 countersunk screws.
With it welded in place you can see how it all works. The crossmember slides over the welded tabs and screws in place. Not actually bolted in the photo's as it was still too [email protected]$king hot!







Hopefully more soon. Very little left to do before priming and painting the chassis. I feel like a little boy waiting for Christmas!
 

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the final welding seems never ending mate, when i did my anglia i ended up going over the cage and chassis with a yellow crayon marking every junction point once it was fully welded. i kept rolling it over on the floor checking 'til i was sure it was all done before paint.
neil.
 

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Oh how I miss Mr McGrinder and Mr McWelder ,but I’m on a downward slope to a better place, BRING ON the summer so we can get out and about, well done matie.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,120 (Edited)
Braking Bad. Pt2

Just gone back into level 3 lockdown here in Auckland, but I will spare you another chapter of the book of Covidicus (unless we lockdown completely).

This is probably the last part of 'heavy engineering', so pull up a chair, pour yourself a stiff one, light your pipe and buckle up.

We briefly touched on the rear calipers. Nice little buggers, freed from their ancestral home under the back of a Volvo and slightly widened to suit the Jag discs. There was, however another slight problem that needed to be addressed:



They didn't fit! I'd mulled over a few options to rectify this: Cutting and welding extensions to the calipers would probably have worked, but I didn't like the idea of relying solely on a couple of 15mm welds where the brakes were concerned.
There was no room to fit an additional 'joiner' bracket as the fixings were too close and would have required a very thin section 'S' bracket.

I came up with this idea:
Make a couple of threaded brackets (in 12mm steel):



Lob off the original threaded mounts from the Jag. You will notice the new brackets incorporate one of the flange mount holes:



And weld the two together (This was 'during', they were seam welded the entire length on both sides, not just these welds):



I'm not sure what the Jag casing is made from, but I suspect it's a good quality cast steel as it welds perfectly. I have to say at this point (before I have to duck the barrage of negative comments) that I am an experienced welder and do a lot of jobs like this commercially. Anyhoo, after welding both sides:





They fit, they clear everything and they don't look too bad. I'm confident that the welds alone would hold up under pressure but with the added mounting bolt it's a 'fit and forget' part.
 
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