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Discussion Starter #101
Yes, that's an option but having it on the inside make a neater line where it crosses the chassis under the sump. Well worth thinking about and I'll take a better look when I pull the engine next.
 

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Discussion Starter #103
I'm not keen on the look of wrapped headers but I am going to get them ceramic coated silver which apparently reduces the radiated heat by 30%.
 

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going the other way cable tie a length of header wrap over the pipe (and that vertical chassis tube if it's easier).
neil.
 

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Discussion Starter #105
That's how I had it before and it worked well so I will probably do the same. I just bought some stainless steel cable ties but ordinary plastic ones worked just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #108
What does the team think about exhaust manifold bolts?

Originally I thought space was going to be very tight so I bought s/s cap head screws but having followed advice and done the welding on the inside there is plenty of room for the popular reduced head hex bolts as sold by Milodon and the like.

Your thoughts...
 

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Discussion Starter #110
I'm a big fan of copperslip. When I built the car (30 years ago) I put copperslip on everything and recently it came apart like I'd built it yesterday. Why studs? less likely to seize and break?
 

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I'm a big fan of copperslip. When I built the car (30 years ago) I put copperslip on everything and recently it came apart like I'd built it yesterday. Why studs? less likely to seize and break?
yes , also no stainless , i would use the non s/s studs and the copper coated nuts , trying to avoid the snapped off bolt in the head syndrome s much as possible .
 

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Discussion Starter #112
Not cobra related by I thought I would share this (and apologies to those who's grandmothers already know how to suck eggs).

I spent a morning this week with a professional welder (Scott) in his workshop. He specialises in ally welding particularly radiators and intercoolers and the likes. I have a no-name Chinese TIG that I got a few years ago and although I've had reasonable success with steel, non at all with ally.

Scott agreed to take a look at my machine to see if there was anything obvious that I had wrong. I learned a lot that morning including:
  • Nothing much wrong with my machine, just me. So that was good news.
  • When welding with the pedal there are only two controls to worry about - the current limit for the pedal and the AC clearance effect.
  • The stuff I was trying to do was a little thin for a beginner. Scott does not do too much under 2mm.
  • You can identify ally filler rods by dropping them flat on the bench - the high-tensile 5000 rods make a bright tinkling sounds whereas the 4000 series do not.
  • When the torch is being stubborn to strike, tapping the filler rod on the work somewhere nearby starts it every time
I had the chance to use Scott's $11K Fronius TIG and there is a BIG difference with a top-end machine
  • Smoother sharper arc with no popping or spluttering
  • Instant striking
  • Better pedal control
  • Lovely small light torch, like welding with a pencil, and on a light flexible hose. So much easier than the heavy thing mine came with.
It was brilliant having someone watch over your shoulder and give instruction, I was very greatful to Scott.

Hope someone found that interesting
 

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Stainless might be ok for bolts, but if using studs and nuts, while Steel parts will corrode together, Stainless to Stainless can gall really badly. I'd be tempted to use a quality Steel stud, which should have a higher tensile load rating than a Stainless one, and a Stainless nut to not corrode and to stay looking pretty. (Go for A4/316 not A2/304 Stainless if possible). JMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter #116
yes what dodgy said myles , stainless on stainless i have used a fair bit , and every now and then it can just seem to glue itself together , so now i use steel bolts or studs , and those copper coated nuts with some copperslip.
I've come across galling but that is usually stainless on stainless. What about stainless bolts into a cast iron head?
 

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Discussion Starter #118
Yes I've been told that too but I've never tried it. We use a fair amount of s/s fasteners at work and when they gall it comes out of nowhere - just loosening a nut and it suddenly binds up and jams, as Robert said - like glue. A little smear of nickel anti-sieze grease makes all the difference.
 

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you could go old school and use brass nuts on the stainless studs, they never seize (y)
 
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