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I want to get some colour on the steel wheels for the roadster, should I, paint, powder coat or stove enamel them? Anyone got any experience of the last two? Thoughts on where to get it done (I live in Suffolk, but happy to travel) and related costs??
 

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Wild Willie Fadster
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Stove enamelling is a bit brittle I have found and powder coating can crack allowing corrosion underneath the cracks. Best finish though has to be powder coating IMHO and its really tough.

A mate has a powder coating company and the variety of colours is amazing.
 

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100% paint. A mate had the Chevy Rally wheels powdercoated for his El Camino and, just as Steve said, the coating cracked where the rim met the centre and the rust spread under the coating.
 

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I'd say powdercoat is as good as anything for 'one piece' items, most of my front end is powdercoated and has held up well, wishbones, spring, steering tie rods, stamped brackets, that sort of thing. The problems seem to arise with two (or more) piece assemblies that have welded or riveted joints. The powder just doesn't seem to want to flow into the joints the way a wet coat paint system does, so it forms a skin across the joint and the first bit of flex can cause it to crack and allow moisture in.
 

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I also would go down the paint route as it will give a great finish and it is the easiest to touch up should you get any damage. As Allready stated Stoving is very brittle and will chip and powder coating is very tough but does have issues where two pieces meet one another
 

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Paint for me too, If you really want to be long lasting before you start mix up some epoxy primer a bit on the thin side and pour a little into the seam, them tip the wheel so it runs all the way around, Then prime and paint as normal. Epoxy is anti corrosive so will keep anything back thats already there.
 

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Nowheresville
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It's a traditional roadster, so paint :)

Powder coating is great if the preparation is meticulous and the application and curing done correctly, but the average jobbing shop coater is either going to be very expensive for that sort of attention, or you'll end up as others said with it flaking off in sheets. Aerocoat (I think) are in or near Yarmouth and do specialist powder coating for bikes, so it might be worth going to see them?

But, it's a traditional roadster, so paint :)
 

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I built a Quantum kit car which came with a powder coated front subframe, and the promise of very long lasting protection against corrosion. It lasted very well, as long as you think three months is a long time that is, after which it fell off in large sheets to reveal a nasty rust covered surface on the subframe. I also had a set of wheels blast cleaned and powder coated then they were stored in my dry garage. A year later there was rust coming through everywhere, but especially in the seam area. But I also rattle can painted a steel workshop bench frame (primer and gloss) about ten years ago. It sat outside for a while while I was having a garage built but even then the paint finish is still holding up well. I think pwder coating depends very much on how good the preperation is (absolutely no rust) and how good the application is (most places just put on a minimal dusting as far as I can see, with little effort to fill the seams). With paint you have full control.
 

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Nowheresville
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Ha, just noticed that - haven't seen him about on any forums for a while though, so maybe still busy working on them. I have seen the car with orange wheels a few times so hopefully just went for paint :)

Still a good subject for discussion.
 

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Nowheresville
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I have no experience of electrostatic wet spraying, but it is advertised as reducing overspray and waste by ensuring most of the paint goes onto the subject. Powder-coating is also electrostatic, and I assume the same problems with Faraday's cage effect apply, whereby the paint is not attracted to (possibly even repelled from) sharp inside corners. Wet paint could flow better into these areas, and being wet I guess it would be easier to touch in these thin areas before the paint is cured.
 
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