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Legs and heels subscriber
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755 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
1st stab at this so trying to keep it simple and to the point. Rather than scenarios.

DO's

- Keep cords away from heat, oil, and sharp edges.
- Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing, and when changing accessories such as blades, bits and cutting discs. Store in a dry place when not in use.
- Secure work (not the tool) with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands to operate the tool.
- keep good footing and maintain good balance when using power tools.
- Electric tools should be operated within their design limitations.
- Gloves, if kept clear of rotating parts, and safety footwear are recommended during use of electric tools.
- Work areas should be well lighted.
- Before an abrasive wheel is mounted, it should be inspected closely and sound- or ring-tested to be sure that it is free from cracks or defects.
(more on this later)
- wear eye protection and hearing protection (if necessary)

DONT's
- Never carry a tool by the cable.
- Never yank the cable to disconnect it from the power socket or to free from a trapped area.
- dont hold a finger on the switch button while carrying a plugged-in tool.
- Wear Loose clothing or jewellry that can become caught in moving parts.
- Electric tools should not be used in damp or wet locations.
- dont use unapproved accessories unless the manufacturer recommends its use on the product; (wire brush in a drill, etc)
- understand the accessory limitations and specifications -- such as speed, size, mounting and guarding requirements, etc. and match this to your specifications of the power tool as shown in the owner/operator's manual; and,
- dont use an accessory that requires the removal of or defeating of any guards, barriers or other safety-related devices on the power tool, unless they are replaced by other appropriate guards or protective devices.

Could go on a lot more,

If anyone want specific topic addressed, please post up the question.

Next I will address Abrasive wheels used on pedestal and hand held grinders.
 

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Semi Proffessional Prat
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3,489 Posts
1st stab at this so trying to keep it simple and to the point. Rather than scenarios.

DONT's

- understand the accessory limitations and specifications -- such as speed, size, mounting and guarding requirements, etc. and match this to your specifications of the power tool as shown in the owner/operator's manual; and,

If anyone want specific topic addressed, please post up the question.

Next I will address Abrasive wheels used on pedestal and hand held grinders.
That doesn't make sense.

One of the major things to do with electrical safety which you haven't mentioned yet, but is important is running portable appliances through a circuit breaker, ELCB of RCD type.
Another good idea is an emergency stop button fitted to a wall, ideally closest to the garage door nearest the house, and all members made aware of the location, so in the event of something going wrong, they can hit the switch and kill the power.

Thank you for your thought provoking article. We all take risks, just takes one to hurt.

Andy
 

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Registered
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200 Posts
That doesn't make sense.

One of the major things to do with electrical safety which you haven't mentioned yet, but is important is running portable appliances through a circuit breaker, ELCB of RCD type.
Another good idea is an emergency stop button fitted to a wall, ideally closest to the garage door nearest the house, and all members made aware of the location, so in the event of something going wrong, they can hit the switch and kill the power.

Thank you for your thought provoking article. We all take risks, just takes one to hurt.

Andy
My whole workshop plug supply is run through a RCB, in the breaker panel, built in when the place was wired. I beleive it is mandatory in a lot of newer houses? You can also retrofit them into ordinary household breaker panels.

This unit was about £50 from Screwfix, and I have a bunch of separate circuits, one for lights, one for a welder plug, one for normal plug circuits, one for compressor etc, so you don't lose all power in the event of a fuse blowing. Both the plug circuits run through the RCD.

I did all the installation work myself, but the electrical hook ups and final inspection/certification was done by a qualified sparky (my nephew).

I like safe. :tup:

 

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Legs and heels subscriber
Joined
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755 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
That doesn't make sense.

One of the major things to do with electrical safety which you haven't mentioned yet, but is important is running portable appliances through a circuit breaker, ELCB of RCD type.
Another good idea is an emergency stop button fitted to a wall, ideally closest to the garage door nearest the house, and all members made aware of the location, so in the event of something going wrong, they can hit the switch and kill the power.

Thank you for your thought provoking article. We all take risks, just takes one to hurt.

Andy
Andy
Youre right mate...typo, doesnt make sense, in the wrong bit...well spotted..

fk me Ive been an auditor for 10 yrs and still miss things.:whistle:

cheers for the tip about breakers. I missed an important item, you added....result :tup:
 

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283 Posts
My garage runs through three breakers, first the main house consumer unit, secondly the main fuse in the garage box, which is then split down to two seperate breakers. First is the lights and second the sockets, ie when a power tool trips the breaker in the garage the lights don't go out while something is still spinning, burning, grinding etc!!!!!!
 
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