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Dont do statistics, too easy to lie, dont believe what people "say" their EV does to the charge, folk lie to save face, but...
I do go along with this., one of my mates who shares my unit has a friend who works for Northern power grid, in true Yorks style when asked about this EV shit said,
"Listen mate, what they are feeding all these Muppets about EV is bollox, its impossible to support it as the WHOLE system is fkd, we spend 24/7/365 just trying to keep the system running today but no one tells you that".....hmm, now where are those "statistics".....for something that hasn't even taken off in full swing yet.
 

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Interesting to read our local councils recent ripost to the much contested bus lanes on the A4 through Slough. These were brought in under the major lockdown without public consultation and are universally hated.
They are looking at removing them - possibly - but looking is about as far as it will get I think.

They cite that pollution has decreased over the last 12 months on the A4 - but of course it has, we have all been locked down! What they don't look at is the increase in polllution in the adjacent roads that everyone is using instead. When this was pointed out to them they had the gall to say the 'even with the take up of EV's, pollution is not the issue, we want everyone out of cars and on the buses'

This I thought was very telling - but destroys their arguement of the bus lanes for lower pollution though. The general population seem to have missed that point though.
The rationale from many local authorities (especially London 'lefty' borough's) I'm sure is to create a short term traffic 'fix' and reduce the amount of roadspace the general public can use. This historically has been done by blocking-off 'rat routes', expanding pavements, installing cycle lanes and no left or right turn junctions. Then we saw the introduction of 24/7 bus lanes operating on routes that don't even offer a 24 hour or night service. More recently we have see the congestion charge in London, followed by the expanded ULEZ zone and the expansion of the operating times and charges. The result has typically led to gridlock in many areas where the above schemes have been implimented and as a result significantly increased pollution in these areas. Couple that with the 'gig' economy and the poliferation of Uber cabs and the like, plus the significant increase in small home delivery vehicles and the pollution issue has become uncontrollable. This is just what the 'lefty' boroughs want to hear.......they'll be telling their residents "its the fault of all these cars" and "you really should use a bicycle or public transport" and conveniently forgetting that their past actions and mis-management, using vehicular transport, parking etc as a 'cash cow' to boost their council coffers.
 

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Ive been into london a few times recently .even with people working from home and little tourism,the trains are rammed.

They and buses cant cope at the best of times.

It wouldn't work at all if no one drove.

It also comes down to finances. If we were to go to our local shopping centre by bus,it would cost us £8 for two return journeys.

I can take the car and use 50 pence in petrol (if that) and two quid for parking. Its a no brainer
 

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Dont do statistics, too easy to lie, dont believe what people "say" their EV does to the charge, folk lie to save face, but...
I do go along with this., one of my mates who shares my unit has a friend who works for Northern power grid, in true Yorks style when asked about this EV shit said,
"Listen mate, what they are feeding all these Muppets about EV is bollox, its impossible to support it as the WHOLE system is fkd, we spend 24/7/365 just trying to keep the system running today but no one tells you that".....hmm, now where are those "statistics".....for something that hasn't even taken off in full swing yet.
Exactly this! It is Fkd. Beyond Fkd.
 

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This is why I spoke up, I'm in the middle of all this and I don't think we should worry about the EV thing, it's a passing phase. We don't have the energy. I think self driving cars are more of a problem, but then I parked my VW in town tonight and had a crowd around it excited to see something different...

I'd like to see E85 back, amazing fuel for turbos and superchargers..
 

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Thought it worth mentioning, today we wrote up a 36p per kw contract for a factory plus 11p per kw for kVa charges plus climate levy which meant the poor sods are now paying almost 50p per kWh.

Add on the capex for EV charging and a margin and you're looking at 70p kWh to charge an EV. That't it, game over for EV.
 

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Isn't it because the price is capped in the domestic market, hence all the furore over a bit of realism when the prices having to go up by 50% in April? 70p kwh would make EV use untenable (if comparing to fuel consumption in the avge ICE vehicle).
 

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Getting back to the point of the thread, buy and drive what you want now, because things are going to get much worse from hereon in. If you have newborns, they will likely never drive a petrol car. Look at what's happening politically, the road is being paved for a new kind of Govt and when the greens get in we are truly screwed
 

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Why do the electricity companys charge more for business than homes.it all comes from the same supply doesn't it
That's a good question. The answer is two reasons the price cap as someone just pointed out, which is currently a lot less than the actual cost of supply.

The other is that it is very low risk to supply a house. You know pretty much how much energy they will use, which is tiny compared to an industrial user and the rates are not complex. They are made up of

1. The wholesale cost of supply.

2. Transmission costs, which are pretty much fixed for households, and very much not for business, but vary by postcode area. For example, in Cornwall I pay 12p per kW for using the network. London might be 8p. Scotland might be 25p. This is buried in your bill and you never see it.

The risk of supplying to business is like this.

You have to know what time they will use the energy. That's because the industrial supplies have time of use factors. Transmission and use costs vary and at peak times, these can be double the non peak.

If you are the supplier, you forward buy your energy if you have any sense, (the ones that didn't and bought on the spot market all went bankrupt).

To forward buy the energy, you need to know what time they will use it fairly accurately. They employ up to 80,000 points of reference to generate this demand curve.

If they get this wrong, and say the factory uses most of it's energy at 4pm in the afternoon not 10am in the morning, they have to buy, off the spot market, the shortfall in energy.

Since Brexit, prices on the spot markets have gone from £35 per MWh to peak at over £4000 a MWh, (that's £40 per unit kWh!!!!!).

You get that wrong too many times, the energy company is bankrupt.

To account for these risks, unless you have a solid supply curve, then you simply up the price to cover say 20% of the energy having to be supplied on the spot market, when you have to pay what ever price is asked, which they will now calculate at £40 a kWh, Pre brexit, this figure was just 20p.

We used to have cheap access to EU energy. It was offered to us, no strings attached, but Borris refused the offer!!!!!!!!!!

The turnip.

So given we import over 40% of our energy.... we used to pay a toll of £15 a MW to import energy over the inter connector to Europe. It is now £94 per MW. We used to be able to take advantage of the mid day settlement market in Berlin, which provided any excess energy, usually wind, at the lowest rates on the network, sometimes as low as £12 a MW. Outside the EU group, this is averaging £281 per MW.

What a result. It's also getting worse. Last Monday, the National Grid was within just 200MW of generating capacity from failing entirely, which, if it wasn't averted would have cause a cascade failure of the network that could have taken down our energy systems for months. This will eventually happen, at least a large local failure, probably Yorkshire or Midlands. When it does, there is something called the "Black Start" protocol. The costs of invoking that are literally catastrophic.

My advice is buy a generator and one of those isolating switch over panels, wire in your ring main with the fridge on it light circuits, combi boiler on a radial spur and buy a lot of diesel and pray we rejoin the common market or that we get a few Gigawatt class offshore wind farms built ASAP.
 

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Getting back to the point of the thread, buy and drive what you want now, because things are going to get much worse from hereon in. If you have newborns, they will likely never drive a petrol car. Look at what's happening politically, the road is being paved for a new kind of Govt and when the greens get in we are truly screwed
Yes, get building and BIVA what ever we build.
 

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I wonder when all these 'smug' Tesla owners will be 'hit' with some additional road charges........? - right now, despite the cost they are the no.1 choice for many higher mileage company users. Despite being far more expensive than most other electric vehicles preferential finance and really low BIK tax rates make them the obvious choice for many. Choose one of the larger, more expensive models (old or new) and you'll get free re-charges at Tesla's Supercharger stations (presuming that is still the case?). So, if you live near one of these, or pass one regularly you can effectively run the car for free. Despite the extreme cost of these vehicles if you do high mileages, other than purchase/lease costs the fact that you can run one for almost free makes it amazing that HMRC allow that to happen (given the lost tax revenue). I guess if all European countries are allowing Tesla owners significant tax benefits it partly explains the meteoric sucess of the brand (and perhaps also shows how vulnerable the company could be to country tax regimes)
 

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So here's a true store from work...a bloke who works for me has a brand spanking new electric car (£430 a month contract thank you very much) In six months it has broken down four times, the latest occasion being this week on a smart motorway (no hard shoulder). Much like a laptop, the car throws up an error code, then shuts down completely before it can be rebooted. He managed to get going again just as a HGV was bearing down at a great rate of knots.
He got the dealer to admit there's a widespread problem but they are not 'at liberty' to go into detail as it would undermine confidence in the car. He's had four loan cars while his was broken, one of which developed the self same fault and had to be returned. Finally they have written off his nearly new car. Strangely the media seem unaware, or unwilling to report on, any widespread problems. Just when will this electric car bubble burst. It can't be long surely?
 
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