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Flange Dealer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pushed the boat out & invested in a TIG welder. What size filler rods should I be buying for bodywork?
 

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Nowheresville
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I've always found 1/16" rods pretty good for general work - sheetmetal, bracketry, even light chassis assembly. If you're only doing bodywork then maybe some smaller diameter (1.0mm) ones would help.
 

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I'm Not Jed Clampett
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1mm or even 0.8 for fine TIG work, you can use MIG wire as said, it is a bit of a pain using it for TIG though as it coils and seems pretty well impossible to straighten out. I feed the 0.8 wire through a fine piece of copper tube when I'm using it.
 

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Flange Dealer
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks guys , a trip to Cromwell in the morning then.
 

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1mm or even 0.8 for fine TIG work, you can use MIG wire as said, it is a bit of a pain using it for TIG though as it coils and seems pretty well impossible to straighten out. I feed the 0.8 wire through a fine piece of copper tube when I'm using it.
Nice idea.
 

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I twist two strands of MIG wire together to make thicker TIG filler. I fold over a length of 0.6 or 0.8mm, clamp one end in the vice and twist it with a cordless drill, and it ends up nice and straight as well. I also twist a strand of stainless, or pure nickel with mild steel MIG wire to give a higher alloy composition if I'm welding alloy steels.
 

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Rekindled Dream
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Hadn't got to the end of the posts. Note to self: read all posts :shake:
1mm or even 0.8 for fine TIG work, you can use MIG wire as said, it is a bit of a pain using it for TIG though as it coils and seems pretty well impossible to straighten out. I feed the 0.8 wire through a fine piece of copper tube when I'm using it.
Have you tried cutting it into manageable lengths then anchor one end and then put the other in a drill. Pull tight and start the drill the twisting action as it coils will straighten it enough to use. You'll need a small chucked drill for the fine wire.

Jon
 

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I'm a grown up drunk!
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As said use 1.6mm for general chassis/bracket work,
Get some 1mm for sheet metal work, i only use .6 and .8 mig wire on 'real' thin stuff.

Dont use gas welding rods or you're likely to get porosity in the welds,
you want A15 grade, the way to tell the difference on 1.6mm and thicker rods is tig rods are crimped near the end with a number stamped into them, gas rods are not crimped at all.
 

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Flange Dealer
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks guys.
 

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Nowheresville
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Was thinking about this again the other day: MIG welds are known for being very hard, so is that a function of the weld/heat time or is the material a harder alloy than A15/A32? If it is the weld time, can they then be annealed for hammering if required?
 

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Lurking Loon
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I believe it's the rapid cooling, and the extra carbon being added from the carbon-dioxide in the shielding gas. I also believe you can anneal them with a torch, or something similar. Could be wrong, though.
 
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