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Can we have some more on the screen frame repairs. Before and after, mine need doing and I'm interested to see the results you have got..... Nice work fella 
 

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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
Can we have some more on the screen frame repairs. Before and after, mine need doing and I'm interested to see the results you have got..... Nice work fella 
Will have a look see if I can find any before pictures. If there is anything not clear here I will try to explain.
I am copying here a piece I did shortly after repairing 2 windscreen frames some years ago.

Opening Windscreen Renovation
My E493A Prefect is pretty much original and the windscreen rubber seals were looking dry and cracking up. I had purchased lengths of weather seal and packing rubber from the club scheme some years back when I thought the restoration would take only a few months. So now it was time to install the final window rubber seal so here goes. Working from the workshop manual I quickly removed the screen frame assembly and peeled out the weather seal. It is ideal if you have a sturdy table covered with a blanket but I had to resort to working on the office floor. The manual stated that I should remove the four screws that retain the sides of the frame, two each side. On one side I managed to release one screw and the other side I had no luck at all. Three screws were rusted in solid and parts of the frame were broken away. Penetrating oil was not any use so I carefully drilled the heads off the countersunk screws, starting with a small drill and working up till the head broke away. Not much room for error as the frame is a complicated construction of thin brass. The cause of the problem is that steel screws and steel corner links are likely to corrode. It was a marvel that I managed to get one screw undone. The corner links were still firmly rooted in the frame so I carefully cut through them where the frame is joined from the back of the frame with my finest saw. The bottom section now came away with the chromed corner plugs and I sprung the frame slightly to remove the glass which was stored safely behind a cupboard indoors.
The remains of the links were unusable so I looked in my brass off-cuts and found some 5mm plate from which to make new ones, just a little thicker than the originals which were 4mm thick. After much wriggling and jiggling I removed the remains of the old links. The frame had cracked with areas completely missing where the links had corroded and expanded inside the frame channel so I cut it back to solid metal all the time trying to preserve as much of the original frame as possible. I made up new sections of brass angle from a suitable thickness brass sheet from the off-cut box again. The bottom rail is curved so I filed a piece of steel plate to suit and gently formed the new section over it. I used another edge of the same piece of steel to form the straight side section. The new pieces were filed to fit the prepared frame, the metal cleaned and lightly clamped in place using a steel bar inside to support them. The repair sections were then silver soldered (also known as hard solder) into position and the corners trimmed to the same angle as the front of the frame. Fortunately, the chrome on the front of the frame was not harmed. Finally the burrs were removed with a fine file and the flat surfaces finished with emery cloth.
The new positions of the countersunk screws were carefully marked out, lightly centre punched and pilot drilled approximately 1.5mm. I then took the new links, cut at 77° and as yet un-drilled, and assembled the frame not forgetting to locate the corner plugs. The frame has to be held tightly in the assembled state while the holes are spot drilled through the frame into the links. On reflection I think a suitable size board with blocks screwed to locate the frame and wedges to tighten it would be a good idea.
I actually only drilled and tapped one hole at a time as the link can float a little in the frame so once the first screw is fitted the link is retained. After separating the frame the links were marked so they would be replaced in the same position then drilled and tapped. The tapped holes also need to be countersunk slightly on the top face otherwise the countersunk screws will not grip the brass frame. I bought new 10.32 UNF x 7/16" long stainless slotted countersunk screws from "Stig" Fasteners although Surplus Supplies are also a good source of these. The screws had to be shortened to about 3/8" by screwing into a steel plate and then cutting and filing till flush with the back. The full length screws can be used to retain the frame hinge brackets. I then gave the bare brass repair sections a coat of Plasticote chrome spray as the frame plating was still in reasonable condition.
I then prepared to fit the glass back in the frame but found the rubber packing supplied by the club did not fit the glass. The packing needs to be about 1.50mm wall thickness and have a groove to suit the 6mm thick glass. I sourced a rubber extrusion from Seals Direct that was 8mm tall (US54) x 1.6mm wall thickness and this fitted well albeit a bit tight. An alternative listed is 16mm tall that could be tried but would need cutting back after assembly. I had to dress the corners of the extrusion by placing it over a piece of 6mm thick board and, using a small block plane, with a recently sharpened cutting iron, to form a radius so the rubber would enter the frame. The rubber was lubricated with silicon grease to aid assembly. I later decided to use 1mm x 50mm rubber strip which was quicker (see pics below).
The weather seal was fitted comparatively easily, corners cut and glued with E6000 adhesive. The exterior frame joint was then sealed with a small bead of black windscreen sealant. If you have a vehicle with an opening windscreen and the frame screws are rusted in solid an alternative approach is to leave them in place, clean up the external glass-to-frame joint and seal with windscreen sealant but if the frame is damaged I hope the above is helpful in your restoration.

30/12/2013. Now I am repairing another two frames I thought I would make the above-mentioned board for holding them in line while drilling the corners. I used the final offcuts from the plywood sheets I bought for a set of floorboards - I knew they would come-in-handy one day.


Frame corner links ready to mark and drill. Remember to put the corner plugs in before marking the holes.

This is one after drilling and tapping 10-32 UNF. I sharpened a drill to a 90 degree point to countersink the links. Screws are stainless steel x 3/8" shortened to 1/4" long as in above text.
The corner links may need additional countersinking and need to be removed for this. I did each hole individually until the screw pulled up tight - need to take it a few thou at a time so as not to over-do it.

Rubber strip packing inserted but not trimmed yet.

And this is what the public should see. Rubber trimmed and black sealant added.



Thats all on the screen for now as I need to fit it temporarily to set the hinge screws in their slots as I dont want too much fiddling when the car is painted and I am fitting the screen for the final time. When I remove it I will only remove the 6 screws at the top of the frame and the two raised countersink screws where the opener attaches at the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter #43 (Edited)
After a long delay due to having a never ending cold and the cold weather driving me indoors to do other jobs I finally got the roof and the mini panel tinned. I used Nealetin solder paste for the tinning and made sure I washed all the flux residue off as it is corrosive but magic on steel sheet. I marked a sight line round the roof hole with my odd-legs so I could centralise the panel and this gave me an 8mm wide lap joint. Then at last the big day - everything ready - gas torch, solder sticks, wooden paddle, wet cloths and panel lined-up on the car. As expected the panel lifted locally when the heat got to it so the first few tacks I pushed it down with the paddle till it set. I directed the heat initially to the body and let it creep towards the roof watching the tinned surface start to melt as I then applied some solder (grade F). I then had another idea. I picked up my heavy steel block and placed it about 12mm from the edge of the panel and started heating again. Perfect- it stopped the heat travelling too far and held the panel down so I could move along faster. Its all soldered now and cleaned up so the next job is to try some lead loading. I would like to fill totally with lead but I must admit this is a skill that I dont have time to fully master so perhaps there will also be some body filler in there too. More pictures later when its fully filled and smooth.





 

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Its looking good :tup:

my prefect has had the same thing done to the a panel to have a pop flip front fitted ive got pop wings prefect bonnet but thinking of slicing the nose off the bonnet to fit an e04a grill shell not entirely made up my mind

Are you putting the swage line in that goes from the inner wings to the bottom of the front doors? I like the line I think it breaks up the pretty flat panel of the door

I do like the e93a front look forward to seeing it finished keep posting:tup:
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
Thanks for the feedback - no plans to put the swage line in at the moment. Would like to get the car mobile first then maybe look at any embellishments. I may well do something with the paint job to give the similar effect. Wait and see.
25/02/2014.
I have spent a lot of time laying and sanding filler around the roof joint and just about ready to put some paint over it. Its surprising that there are a few small dents in the Mini roof as it looked so good when I bought it but then it was dirty so only me to blame for not spotting them. I know it wont be perfect but its as good as I can get it for now. If I am not completely happy with the result I will return to it when I have done the A panels as they will also need a skim of filler.
The roof bows are next - I have put in the ones I have, one of which needed repairing both ends. These will be the basis for making new ones that will fit closer to the roof shape. Pictures soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
The roof is looking better now as I have done rubbing down the filler and on to priming. Just dodging the weather at the moment - mild one day too cold the next and with no real heating in the garage I rent.


Just had to add a picture of the front with bonnet back on. This is the bonnet I got with the car so the colour is not my choice. I think it had been sat on at some time as the shape didn't match the scuttle. I got out a ratchet load strap and wound it up till the middle started to crown up plus a bit more - three attempts and it was a better match and the paint didn't crack. Seems to be a problem with the hinges as the back of the bonnet catches the wiper spindles if you dont pull it forward when raising. Another glitch to sort.
13/04/14. Just started pulling the hinges apart and found the central pair of pins and the holes in the arms very worn. These are 1/4" diameter semi-tubular rivets and each has about 5 thou wear. The arms are also worn about 15 thou so I reckon new pins made from 7mm bolts suitably modified and half nuts Loctited in place plus also maybe a centre punch dot for good measure. Hopefully just repairing the central pair will do the trick as I cant feel any play in the other four.





This view reminds me of a Fordson or Ferguson - tractor? The badge and its chrome ornament were a good find - only used on certain models for a short time and also exports I believe.

 

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Super cool :tup:

Keep the updates coming

I did the same with my bonnet and a ratchet strap I think the panels were just poorly fitted back then
 

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Discussion Starter #48 (Edited)
Is it not always the way? I just started getting ready to make up the brackets for period type telescopic front dampers, borrowed some to copy. Then along comes a set on ebay, never fitted to a car and with a little surface rust. Just had to have them and so I did. Now they are all sprayed up waiting for my spring to come back from Jones and then I can assemble the front suspension and see how it all sits. In the meantime I'm trying to get my A panel fill panels finished. I knew they would be a challenge and so they are to be sure. This is where I have got to at the lower part of the wing where the new panel will meet the front end of the running board.



This is the one of the inner wing panels I made about a year ago, put to one side while I made the external fill piece. Nows the time to see how it all goes together.


With just a few adjustments it all went together. I may have to open out or elongate a few holes but if thats all I am laughing. Below is the offside inner wing clipped in place. You wouldn't believe the effort and time it has taken to get this section of the car to this point - I just have to be careful I dont cock it up and have to make a new piece.



Before going any further I have picked up the new running boards so I can work out where I need to drill fixing holes and also where I need to form blisters to clear bolts in the chassis. The extra bolts are where I have fitted the ladder bar cross member and also the floor member I moved back by 2". I prefer to blister the panel over the bolt heads as just making a big hole weakens the panel unnecessarily and looks bad. ! Change of plan - decided to fit spacers between the running board and chassis as this allows a better fit round the front wing. I will leave a flap at the back to fill the gap when I cover the running board with broad ribbed rubber.
Awaiting picture.........................

 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
I have just started fitting the running boards as the fit and alignment are closely related to the wings and the home-made valance that blends the wing to the A panel. Its a chicken-egg-chicken game balancing the undrilled running board on axle stand and screw jack and pulling the wing in and out to get a decent match-up. Here is the starting point with 2 bolts finger tight holding the running board and also clamps each end to stop it sagging. It looks ok but still a long way to go.





You will see the back end of the running board is unfinished. Thats the way it comes as I assume there are differences in the models or years so its up to the fitter to make it fit. Would have been better if the manufacturer had made them a few inches longer so they could be cut to fit. Now I have to make an extra bit and weld it on so there is a nice blend to the mudguard and its not an easy form to make either as it has to curve in towards the wing. Anyway, plenty else to do. Tomorrow I hope to get the A panel closing plates finished and make more adjustments to the home-made valance. This piece is like a spring after so much shaping so it resists going where I want it to go so it may be necessary to partially hot form it in-situ. Work in progress.
13/04/14. The hot forming worked - gentle red heat next to the bit I wanted to move and pushed with a piece of round bar. It will need taking off and smoothing on the rounded wooden block (an old bossing mallet head) with a mallet but all good so far. Just one thing I forgot - the nearest skin pin got too near the heat and melted so now fixed it with an ally piece for when I do the other side.



04/04/14. Today had a couple of hours to sort out the A post closing panels, a fiddly job laying on my back most of the time so while there I took a couple of pictures. They are mostly done now and held in place with Avdel clamps, what could be called skin-pin alley. Now on to the other running board. Because the converging pieces are all linked and need to line up I have to keep jumping from one bit to the other.


The strange shaped hole in the corner is the drain - swaged out trumpet fashion with a ball bearing and will also be where the winscreen drain tube will pass out but leaving plenty room around it to drain any other water that may get in there. The three holes at the back are where the original inner wing was rivetted. The previous owner removed the rivets but some of the original panel remains although I am covering it completely with a new piece and using these holes for M5 button head bolts.
Having made my own inner wing section I needed to fit some form of threaded device so I could bolt the wings to them. I decided that a weakness here in the original car, ie hank bushes, caused local distortion and allowed the water in so I have made up these so there is an element of strength each side of the bolt. I have fitted these one side and so far it has worked well. Some wing bead will make a tidy finish.

13/04/14. The plate with tapped hole is held in place with two small screws in case it needs moving and when finaly positioned and painted there will be two countersunk pop rivets there. The plate has a deep countersink because the inner wing is also countersuk so has to lock into this. I made a set of tools to go in my Whitney punch to form a countersink in the inner wing panel. The long plate is a clamp to spread the load. And here it is, the fitted assembly.



Another tricky job coming up soon. I need to place another bolt in the plate that supports the A post as it has spread away from the chassis slightly. Problem is the bolt head will be inside a box member. Fortunately there is a large hole about 12" in so plan is this - 1. drill the bolt hole 1/4" clearance. 2. Drill the tip of the bolt 1.6mm x 6mm deep to accept a length of weld rod. 3. Pass the rod through from the outside until it can be hooked through the large hole, apply a dab of Loctite, place a spring washer over the bolt thread, and glue the bolt on using the small hole drilled in the end of the threaded section and go have a cup of tea.
5. Pull the rod back till the bolt appears through the 1/4" hole and thread on a large washer plus a spring washer and nut. Tighten the nut and if happy cut off the rod.






It worked a treat.
 

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Discussion Starter #50 (Edited)
The final A panel

Next job is to make an A post panel to link my double curved valence to the bottom section of the A post.
I now have all the stuff for the Ballamy front end - extra long U bolts, Poly bushes and tubes for the spring so hopefully will get this done by the weekend.
29/04/14. 'A' post sections made and I made some basic steel formers for the sections and they look about right. Now just painting the parts that will be inaccessible after welding and tacking. I know some of this paint will burn where I need to gas weld but this is better than nothing. I am asking a local friend and welder to Mig some of the joins so need to get organised so he can do this in one visit.
I have decided to shelve the Ballamy set-up for now and fit a standard front axle but with an extra 2nd leaf added to help with the heavier engine.
The bonnet side panel usually just sits against a rubber bumper but I have added a Dzus fastener to keep it from vibrating.
These are the outer A post repair sections.




And this is the converter valence with details added to fill the gap at the front where wing meets the scuttle.


Now getting close to fitting all this metal and cant wait to get this finished. I have some Galvafroid been on the shelf for years so thought I would use this inside the inner wing panels where there is usually corrosion that cant be seen till it breaks out somewhere. Two or three coats should be good. it takes 24 hours to cure so I can do this in between easing the small dents out of the wings. One wing had apparently been used or tried in a rod before I got it near Taunton. I had to patch in a fair sized chunk of metal and match up to the louvres. I used the other wing as a pattern. This is the finished job.

The rusty areas are the new steel. Louvres still need some tidying but it will all look better for a coat of primer.
 

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Discussion Starter #51 (Edited)
A panel and A post all welded and now just skimming with filler where my hand work is not up to scratch.

This is a strong section and should last many years. Now its smoothed off have given it a blast of etch primer.


The inner wing section will get a few coats of satin chassis black to match the undersides of the wings. Now all the welding is done I can fit the plastic drain tube that runs from the lower corners of the windscreen, down inside the A panel and out through the drain hole mentioned earlier.
I decided to carry on with the Ballamy suspension with encouragement from Tony Russell who wrote the Ballamy book "Out in Front". It still has one extra leaf so will see how it sits with all the panels etc fitted also how it rides before deciding whether to take one out. Its a bit bow-legged at present.

 

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Discussion Starter #53 (Edited)
Really nice tidy work :tup:
Thanks - all compliments gratefully received.

Now I must finish the running boards. I decided to cut a few inches off the back end, joddle it and make a new ready-made back end as this way I can more easily get the fit between the front and rear wings. The rubber top will be 6mm pitch square topped ribbed matting as this is the best match I can find to the original stuff. G. Baines - recommended supplier.
27/06/14.

All I need now is ideal weather to spray the satin black chassis paint under the wings and the running boards. At this rate I wont have time for a holiday - sad.
29/08/14. Well, I did manage to get in a holiday hence not much progress for a couple of months (not all holiday).
And here's one of the running boards with its rubber overcoat.

 

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Discussion Starter #54 (Edited)
Mostly painwork to do now till winter puts a stop to it. The boot door that I got with the car had been painted and is in good nick but I want to change the colour. I want to avoid rubbing the edges back to bare metal so thats a question for the forum. All the fiddly bits like headlamps take time but getting there. My lamps, bought on ebay, were early Prefect E93A and in reasonable condition but with one difference to the post war ones - the base plate gimble was smaller so I opined that this was modified for a good reason. I managed to find two base gimbles from later lamps and luckily the rivet holes matched so they are now fitted using M5 button head screws. I still need one of the base mounting ally castings, the left one that has an 'L' cast on the base. I had some of the base mounts cast up but if I can find an original they can go back in the pot. Also need one of the hemi-spherical washers that fit on the mounting bolt and then they will be ready for painting.
Had a small success re-setting the rear offside door that had been poorly repaired in a previous accident before I got it. A g-clamp and a block of 2"x3" pulled the top in just about right using the B-pillar as a standard. Now all the doors fit and shut nicely having made oversize pins for 3 hinges. Sprayed the grill and the bumpers with a pearlised silver wheel paint bought ready to use.
 

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Discussion Starter #55 (Edited)
Just starting to paint a few bits. I am not a professional and learning all the while. One thing has struck me - hard - is how many imperfections in the surface to be painted show up on the first coat of primer. Anyway I am pressing on and this is the colour I am planning to use - violet blue - a good name for a racing pigeon.



This is the number plate light. I have a small batch of these lamps to renovate - the rest are black of course. The colour is not far off what I saw when trawling the net for ideas. This was on a Prefect in New Zealand and as I am fitting a lot of export stuff it seemed appropriate colour and I like anyway.
And this is the finished lamp with new 'glass' window fitted.



And this is the headlamp. Colour here is lighter than actual. One day perhaps I will get a picture on here that is near to reality.


As the ladder bars come a little too close to the heel plate at the front of the back seat box I have cut slots in the 18mm thick floor above the bars for about 4" long. I then capped the resulting elongated holes with neat aluminium plates. Hopefully the additional 18mm will be enough to clear on full bump.

Next mechanical job is to revisit the handbrake which is not holding at all well. Problem is due to me wanting to keep the original umbrella handle lever under the dash. This should have a longer pull so first option is to make a longer input lever in the relay/balancer unit. Should be a case of making a longer lever and arranging a new anchorage for the front cable and adjuster. I reckon it needs to be at least 50% longer.
08/10/14. Handbrake relay lever extended to more than twice the original length and now feels better with longer pull on the umbrella and rear wheels seem to be holding well. Real test later on an incline of course. I put a few evenly spaced alternative holes for the front cable clevis in case I needed to change the ratio but so far it seems good. I just hope my nipple soldering holds up - many years of making my own motorcycle cable will hopefully stand up to car type usage.






Meanwhile its carry on painting.
01/10/2014. Still rubbing down and filling, especially the roof. I am about ready to spray the bonnet and roof with colour and then its the door shuts etc. I think its nearly time to get the old girl down off the ramps to make it a tad easier to stretch over the roof with spray gun when standing on a milk crate.
Main challenge is keeping the primer and colour off the parts I dont want to paint. I made a couple of 'rickets' where I left a minute gap only to find some spray had leaked through and spoilt previous work. I have found some large cardboard boxes and these are being cut to fill in the wheel arches, windows and side panels - plenty of newspaper and masking tape too of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #56 (Edited)
14/10/14. Now the car is down on the ground it seems weird - feels low because its been on ramps for so long and the back ramps were a bit higher than the fronts. Its definitely low at the back - or is it high at the front? I will take some measurements today and a few pictures so I can decide whether to put some spacers over the rear spring to bring it back up level again or even raised at the back a nats. Maybe I will remove that extra leaf from the front spring after all.
22/10/14. I think I have found the reason why the front is high. While messing with the front spring I doubled up the #2 leaf and the extra one is same length as the original. I didn't notice that the #2 leaf has to pass under the shackle lug on the axle arm but it is a close clearance normally. With the extra leaf it jams tight therefore the spring cannot work and it all becomes spring-bound - doh. So saturday its off with the spring and nip off the ends a shade. Meanwhile its carry on spraying. I hope to do the roof tomorrow and put two or three coats on the bonnet now the humidity has come down below 80%. Progress has been slow because mainly whenever I start spraying primer on a new area I find a few more dents or chips although I am at the stage where I need to get it painted and leave perfection for another year.






Cardboard windows are only temporary but I am getting to like the look with them blue borders.
 

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Discussion Starter #57 (Edited)
29/10/2014. At last the front spring is working and the car is sitting about right. I needed to take an inch off each end of the extra leaf and, when assembled, it bounced firmly and the front wheels are sitting right at last, axles lined up much the same as the original rigid axle and the shackles at the normal angle. Now I can set the toe-in roughly and tighten the shackle bolts. While the weather is damp and painting is out I can start making the three remaining roof bows. These will have about 3mm clearance under the roof so I can bed them in finally with Sikoflex. Picture shows the new pine one compared to the original. This shows the extra height of the Mini roof but the head lining will be the same level as before.


And here they are all fitted but not yet fixed with Sikaflex.


And here with the numbers 2 & 3 bows rebated to take the interior light from a Chevrolet truck I believe. Luckily the original plywood base and steel fitting plates were a perfect fit although they were fitted to numbers 3 & 4 when the car was produced in 1953.


Did I mention that I used pine from a bed frame I 'rescued' from a house clearance last year to make the bows - maximum tightening of the wad as usual.

Also, need to get the nearside kick panel made and fitted because the wiper motor is a close fit and I dont want to remove this and the parcel shelf again just to get one screw in. Ahh - found that if I cut a bit more out of the parcel shelf (hardboard sealed with knotting) I can just get the difficult parcel shelf in so all is good. I have some old panels so these are to be used as templates for the screw holes and air vent aperture.
I finally got the wiper spindles situated correctly by robbing the aluminium supports from the old vacuum mechanism as without these tightening the lock nut tilted the spindles down and they were catching the back edge of the bonnet. Another loose end tied up.
I am looking to fit an effective seal to the boot door as mostly these seem to use a sponge stick-on strip about 10x 16 mm. I have tried a small piece of a hollow D section sponge rubber that sits in the channel but I would prefer rubber to sponge. I will report back later.
I got a sample of R909 from Woolies and this seems to be perfect being rubber and it squashes down to make a seal. I have ordered 2 metres although its pricey at around £6 a metre. A good boot seal is essential if you want to keep the sandwiches dry. This is what the seal looks like. On this sample I cut both the legs down about 4mm but when the full length is fitted I will only need to cut one down so it doesn't bottom out in the channel.


10/11/14. Well I bought a length and trimmed it and fitted it and now the boot doesn't shut completely. I think a short piece compressed ok but a full top and sides is too resistant. I've got several options so will report back later.
19/11/2014. A bit of research discovered silicon spray can soften rubber. I had a can somewhere and found it today so had a go - magic. Within half and hour the rubber was much softer so I gave it a second dose and sealed it in a carrier bag ready to try again tomorrow.
Tomorrow. Boot still wont shut fully so it looks like back to the drawing board.
 

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Discussion Starter #60 (Edited)
"It looks more like a car now"

The lady I rent the garage from popped her head round the door post today and stated "it looks more like a car now" - well she has seen it progress over the last 3 plus years. Not much happened in the first year while I bought stuff and tried to decide what I wanted to achieve. Here is the view she had -


Still got to spray one door if the weather dries up soon. I managed to fit the windscreen single-handed but I think I will get some help with the back window although the last time I did one the helper managed to break it with an almighty thump. He was used to fitting modern glass plus the rubber was very hard - probably been in stock a long time. Perhaps this time I will use the silicon spray before I start but not near the join. I noticed the old rubber seal was joined with a scarf joint - seems a good idea. Here's the windscreen with wipers, interior mirror and suction tax disk holder fitted. I have the disk from when the car was last on the road so think it neat to keep it on display seeing as I wont get a new one when it returns to tarmac.

 
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