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Semi Proffessional Prat
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All depends on a number of factors.
The handheld has lower power output, and a very compromised aireal.
The moble one will need an external 12 volt supply, and an external antenna, which will make it a lot more efficient. But it has limited frequency range.

How far would you like to get with a radio?
 

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Administrator
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm unsure really as my family is thinking of a cabin cruiser
So I assume 90% of the time it would be inland.
 

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Premium Member
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Darren,
get down to a marina with a good chandlery that sells the things you are looking for ,the big yard at Burnham has a good one, or Fox's in Ipswich have a great range if you are that way. I would imagine theres one in Maldon if thats closer for you.

Gary.
 

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Heavy Oiler
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Neither would be any good. You need a marine VHF with European channels. You also need an operators licence and ships licence (free) to use legally
 

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Heavy Oiler
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Edit : if it's inland, do you need a radio?
 

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Heavy Oiler
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There are two types, VHF & DSC (the DSC- Digital Selective Calling is an add on) DSC is programmed with your MMSI number that gets issued to you with your ships licence. You only have one shot at entering it, then it has to go back to manufacturer for reset if you get it wrong.
So not worth buying secondhand.

European Marine VHF have all the same channels / frequencies which are a mix of duplex and simplex. USA use slightly different frequencies and less duplex ones, so if you get a USA one, you wont be able to talk to anyone (and it would be illegal) http://www.scotsail.co.uk/vhf_radio_answers.html
http://licensing.ofcom.org.uk/radiocommunication-licences/ships-radio/faq/vhf-faq/

For all these reasons I would buy one from a chandlery near you. I can offer advice on types and makes and which would be better for your boat if you like.

You obviously don't hold a VHF licence or you would know all this already. You can get a licence on a one day course from any RYA training school that offers the course. Marine Radio (SRC) | Specialist Short Courses | Courses | Learning | Courses & Training | RYA .

You also need a ships radio licence Ofcom | Ship’s Radio or Ship Portable Radio
 

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Heavy Oiler
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Registered
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All of the above, don't buy cheap imports as Col says the channels are wrong. If you need a radio do the course first and then get the operators licence and then the ships licence and then get the radio (by then you will have a better idea about what type of radio you want)
 

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Semi Proffessional Prat
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Just for your amusement.

 

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Heavy Oiler
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All of the above, don't buy cheap imports as Col says the channels are wrong. If you need a radio do the course first and then get the operators licence and then the ships licence and then get the radio (by then you will have a better idea about what type of radio you want)
..........Which is why I asked if he really needed one inland? If it was me, I would use my mobile.
At sea is a completely different matter. (From someone with DSC licence & Radios)
 

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Heavy Oiler
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Have you got a boat to fit it to?

That was a good radio but getting on a bit now. Think it dates to the '80s. Made by Seafarer (who made echo sounders) No DSC. For less than £100 more you could have got a new DSC radio with a G'tee.

You said you wanted it for emergency. I would buy the best kit you can afford. What price can you put on safety? A 30 odd year old radio? No DSC?

Icom M323 would be my choice for a good budget set for around £150-£160, or a Cobra Mr-f55eu for under £100 if your budget is smaller.

Don't forget you still need an antenna. Glomex 2.4 mtr is a good choice.
 

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Heavy Oiler
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Refiited to BSS standard?

What have you got?
 
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