Rods 'n' Sods - UK Hot Rod & Street Rod Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Exceeded sell by date
Joined
·
7,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anybody on here who may have an idea of how to do this?
I need to put the name of a club on a piece of elm which I have. What I would like is to have the elm routed out with the letters and then inlay with copper or something that is still classy. Trouble is I have not got a clue if it can be done or if it can who do I go to? Any ideas much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Rout the letters out then spray paint the letters with a copper colored paint, it will probably will need a couple of coats.
When its all properly dry sand the surface of the board and spray the whole lot with a clear finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,630 Posts
I'm no carpenter, but if I we're doing it, this is what I'd do (depending on size)

For a bigger peice, take you're router, fit the guide boss and the smallest straight cutting bit. Dunno what they call it but calculate the radius gap between boss and bit, ie, 30mm guide boss, 10mm bit, works out to be 15mm - 5mm = 10mm. Design you're lettering accounting for a 10mm oultine either on paper or PC. Scan it in and send it off to a laser cutting service. Have the brass sheet engine turned or polished prior to cutting. Have it laser cut and buy the waste material as your template. Set the bit depth as required. Route the material out, finish the right angle corners with a stanley and sharp chisel, stain / varnish, let dry, de-nib with scotchbrite, then use a decent two part adhesive to glue the laser cut piece into place. Wax the wood to finish.

For a smaller piece masking tape on piece, draw the design on, scribe the design in with a stanley, route out the bulk of the material freehand, finsih the detail by hand with chisel. Brush in a yellow basecoat to the recessed letter. Apply one shot gold size in the recesses evenly, use varigated brass leaf, burnish into place with a cottom ball or make up brush. Brush clear size over the leaf, then coat the whole piece in one shot clear.

Might actually have a go myself :tup:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
601 Posts
You could try routing the letters and then filling them with epoxy resin mixed with copper powder. You can get various metal powders from sculpting suppliers (Tiranti Ltd. in Thatcham, Berkshire are online) and you could use copper, aluminium, brass, etc. The epoxy can even be patina'd for an added bit of interest. Once it has hardened sand the piece back to the would and Fanny's your Aunt.
 

·
Exceeded sell by date
Joined
·
7,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the ideas there, some good suggestions. We had thought of paint but felt it would look better with metal inlaid. The gold size sounds much better. This is to show the name of a club(Non car related) and will sit on a display table at some high end exhibitions. Most exhibitors use a printed sheet and we wanted to go much further than that. The elm is a piece of burr about 8" wide and 4" deep.
 

·
Off the Xmas card list
Joined
·
24,267 Posts
What about planed then lacquered and Gold leaf lettering and pinstriping, I'm sure Ian ( Big Boss man ) would have some cracking ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,111 Posts
Steve , have you got an old school type sign makers in your area , the type that make the perspex shop fascias/signs ? . A pantograph would be ideal for that job , they could cut the letters out of copper sheet too so they'd be an exact fit .
 

·
Banjo snapper.
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Not 100% certain, but can't laser & water jet cutting be used for timber as well as metal?
 

·
Banjo snapper.
Joined
·
3,507 Posts

·
Exceeded sell by date
Joined
·
7,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks all for some good idea's and handy links. I think I have enough info to proceed now. Will let you know the outcome.:tup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,111 Posts
Never had you down as the facetious type Al but I'm always willing to learn about water jet cutting , good boy .

Can the depth of the cut be controlled with water jet ?
 

·
Banjo snapper.
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Sorry Ron, I wasn't aiming at being facetious, it was just my standard nob setting, maybe went a little over defensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
I'm an ex-parrot, sorry cabinet maker/furniture restorer and we used to do this with veneer letters so it'll be the same with copper. I'd get the letters laser cut, then temporarily glue them to the piece you want to inlay them into - double sided tape, spray mount, alsorts really as long as the letters are as close as you can get to the substrate.

Ideally you need each letter with a slight draft/angle to the edge so that, when it drops into the hole in the substrate, the glue line is minimal - and if you do it right non-existent.

Then cut round each one really carefully with a modelling knife or scalpel - it needs to be a nice fine blade. Sorry, a Stanley's too big and cumbersome. Ideally you need a chisel-type edge; one sharpened on one side only but, you won't get that unless you make it, which is what we used to do.

Then, peel the letters off and register the depth of the letter on a router - to do this, set the cutter flush with the surface - by putting the baseplate onto the substrate and dropping the cutter onto it. Then set the depth stop to this. Next, back the depth stop off and slide the letter/material in between the depth stop and depth stop slide - this will obviously give you the depth - lock it off real tight. Also, make sure the collet's clean, cutter shaft clean and burr free and it's tight too - I've had them 'climb' and go right through a precious veneered surface - Whoops!

I then used to drop the router into each cut out to be cut out and work it out free hand - you need a steady hand of course and you might need your glasses too - I would now!! You can work it as close as you can get to the scribed line but you'll find you can get close and the last little bit will flick out - takes nerve/practise though but it works. You can of course chicken out and trim the last bit with a craft knife/sharp chisel.

Then glue the copper in with Araldite using a wax paper (stops the glue sticking to the block/wood etc) over the top and a block and a small G-cramp. You could use Super Glue too or as we used to do, Scotch Glue but, it stinks! And you need a glue pot And a....

Afterwards, don't sand it flush as you'll ruin the surface finish and get copper dust in the grain - unless you're after the metal flake look, it won't easily come out; you'll end up with a metalflake halo around each letter!


Hope that helps?

Cheers,

Jon
 

·
Enthusiastic Amateur
Joined
·
757 Posts
inlaying

I would give serious thought about using the solid lump of Elm you have, it must be well kiln dried or your going to waste a lot of time and effort,
I would consider some Burr Elm veneer and copper sheet, The veneer is glued to some paper -on the face, sandwich the two together, the copper and the elm venner , draw out your design then carefully fretwork it all out, -- you will have two choices inlay copper into elm, or inlay elm into copper, not too sure about the reaction of the copper to many of todays high build polishes, Acid catalyst comes to mind as its easy to appy,then wet and dry back then burnish up, the inlay technique is a very popular method for marquetry, The copper may need an expoxy to glue it to whatever backing you choose, then you can consider various bandings and inlays for the edge, Alternativly anyone doing the engraving for signs,using that multi layer plastic, dog tags etc etc, on a Gravograph / pantograph should be able to inlay / router a text into the wood then consider inlaying that with a liquid plastic/copper resin, flat it then polish, wet and dry and burnish.
if you been down southern italy every other shop has an old man fretworking musical boxes and pictures, Just the same as having two sheets of coloured paper, cut the design out and one fits into the other. perfect fit, you will see the fretworker cutting multiple layers of veneers making several desings in the one cut.

Ian
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top